12 Feb 2019

Aviation Maintenance Technology Classes

Spartan’s Aviation Maintenance courses are designed to teach students the technical skills required to become entry-level Airframe and Powerplant technicians or obtain employment in related professions. View the courses by clicking on a location: Tulsa Campus, Denver Campus, Los Angeles and Inland Empire Campus. 

Successful completion qualifies the graduates to take the written, oral and practical tests with the Federal Aviation Administration for the Mechanic’s Certificate with both Airframe and Powerplant Ratings.

AMT Classes Offered at the Tulsa Campus

GEN 1001 – Basic Electricity | 4 Credits

In this course, students will study scientific laws and theories of electricity and its application to aircraft systems, components, and circuits. Concepts studied include fundamentals of magnetism, DC circuits, and AC circuits. In addition, students study the use of electrical measuring instruments, multi meters, and basic troubleshooting procedures. Students will perform analyses of electrical circuits and determine resistance, current, voltage, inductance, capacitance, impedance and power. Upon successful completion of this course, students should have a sound foundation of electrical theory and its application to aircraft systems and components, as well as knowing how to read and apply basic electrical schematics to aircraft.

GEN 1002 – Aviation Science | 4 Credits

This course will continue the study of electrical concepts to include, batteries, and additional information on reading and interpreting aircraft electrical circuit diagrams that include digital and solid-state circuits and logic functions. The students will perform laboratory experiments relating to electrical and electronic circuits. Students study aircraft drawings and make drawings of aircraft parts and repairs to aircraft parts. This course will also contain a detailed study of aviation materials and processes, that include the basic knowledge and skills in the use of basic mechanics hand tools, hardware and safety methods, principles of nondestructive testing including eddy current, ultrasonic, magnetic particle and dye penetrant procedures, and the student perform laboratory experiments in these procedures. Students will use precision measurement equipment including micrometers, calipers and dial indicators. Students will learn about and fabricate the various types of fluid lines and fitting used in the aircraft. In addition, the students will study aircraft cleaning and corrosion control methods and techniques and perform a corrosion inspection. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to service batteries, read wiring diagrams, read and complete drawings, demonstrate knowledge of aircraft materials and processes, aircraft fluid lines and corrosion control process.

GEN 1003 – Aviation Maintenance Practices | 4 Credits

This course covers topics, including technical writing in maintenance publications and maintenance forms and records, Students will read, select, and use FAA and manufacturer’s aircraft maintenance specifications, data sheets, manuals, publications, technical data, related Federal Aviation Regulations and aircraft records keeping. The course also incorporates aircraft ground operations and servicing procedures. The course covers a detailed study of aircraft weight and balance, including the actual weighing of an aircraft.  Lab projects for these topics are performed enhance classroom lecture. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to read in interpret maintenance publication, complete aircraft maintenance forms and records, perform basic ground operations and servicing of aircraft, weigh aircraft and perform all calculations, be aware of mechanic privileges and limitations and understand Human Factors that can affect aircraft maintenance.

AFP 1001 – Electrical and Fire Protection Systems | 4 Credits

This course provides study of airframe and powerplant electrical systems, including inspection and repair of components and related wiring, power distribution, and circuit troubleshooting. This course includes a detailed study of electrical schematics and their application and troubleshooting. This course also covers the study of various aircraft fire protection, detection, and extinguishing systems. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to troubleshoot and repair airframe electrical systems, know how to read and apply electrical schematics, and understand the operation and repair of aircraft fire protection systems.

ARF 2001 – Metallic Structures | 4 Credits

In this course, aircraft sheet metal structures and different fastening methods are studied in detail. Students will accomplish a wide variety of lab projects leading to an understanding of subject material. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to perform all basic tasks required of an aircraft maintenance technician related to metallic structures.

ARF 2002 – Non-Metallic Structures | 4 Credits

Students in this course will learn about composite structures including fiberglass, Kevlar, various core materials, and Plexiglass. Extensive lab work will enhance learned objectives. Also, covered in this course are wood structures, fabric coverings, and aircraft finishes. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to accomplish aircraft composite structure work, and can explain aircraft wood and fabric. Students should also to apply the finish to an aircraft.

ARF 2003 – Hydraulics and Landing Gear Systems | 4 Credits

The theory, operation, and maintenance of aircraft hydraulic and pneumatic systems are covered. The troubleshooting, maintenance, and repair of both systems is stressed. Aircraft landing gears, including retraction systems, oleos, brakes, wheels, and tires, are also studied. This course also includes study of aircraft position and warning systems. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to troubleshoot and repair aircraft hydraulic and pneumatic systems, aircraft landing gears, and understand the concepts of aircraft position and warning.

ARF 2004 – Comm/Nav and Instrument Systems | 4 Credits

This course covers the theory, operation, and maintenance of aircraft communication and navigation systems and the wide range of aircraft instrument systems found in today’s aircraft. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to explain the operation and maintenance of aircraft communication, navigation, and instrument systems.

ARF 2005 – Airframe Systems | 4 Credits

This course covers the theory and operation of aircraft cabin atmosphere control systems, ice and rain control systems along with water and waste systems. Aircraft fuel system theory, maintenance, and troubleshooting are also discussed, as well as the basic concepts of welding. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to explain the basic operation cabin atmosphere control systems, ice and rain control systems, maintain an aircraft fuel system, and perform basic welding processes.

ARF 2006 – Flight Controls and Airframe Inspections | 4 Credits

This course covers aircraft control surfaces, including system rigging, maintenance, inspection, and troubleshooting. This course also covers the basic concepts of rotary wing maintenance and operations. Also covered are the inspection techniques as they to the aircraft structure and its related systems. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to rig a general aviation aircraft, know the basic concepts of rotary wing aircraft and perform airframe conformity inspections. This course also includes a review and testing period to aid the student in FAA Airframe Certification.

PPT 2001 – Reciprocating Engines | 4 Credits

This course covers the theory and operation of a reciprocating engines. All internal components are studied, along with how each part functions. A reciprocating engine is disassembled, measured, reassembled, and timed. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to explain the operation of a reciprocating engine.

PPT 2002 – Reciprocating Engine Systems | 4 Credits

In this course the study of reciprocating engine lubrications, induction and engine airflow systems, engine cooling systems, and reciprocating engine exhaust systems are covered in detail. Reciprocating engine instrument systems are discussed. A reciprocating engine is removed and reinstalled. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to explain the operation of and inspect, troubleshoot and repair of engine induction, cooling, exhaust, and reciprocating engine instrument systems and can remove and reinstall an aircraft reciprocating engine.

PPT 2003 – Fuel Metering and Propellers | 4 Credits

In this course, students study the theory and operation of a wide variety of propellers and controlling governors. Reciprocating engine fuel and fuel metering devices, including float carburetors and fuel injection systems, are explained in detail. Upon completion of this course, students should understand all propeller operation and inspection requirements, and can troubleshoot and repair reciprocating engine fuel and fuel metering devices.

PPT 2004 – Engine Inspection and Operation | 4 Credits

In this course ignition systems, including magnetos, spark plugs, leads, and auxiliary starting systems, are covered in detail. A magneto is disassembled, inspected, reassembled, internally timed and timed to the engine. Lab activities include the ground operation, troubleshooting and repairs to various reciprocating engine systems. Students will perform a powerplant conformity inspection using FAA records and manufacturer’s publications and manuals. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to troubleshoot, repair, and time an aircraft magneto, and troubleshoot shoot and repair various reciprocating engine systems, explain engine ground operation procedures and perform engine inspection.

PPT 2005 – Turbine Engine Fundamentals | 4 Credits

This course studies turbine engine theory of operation as it applies to turbojet, turboprop and turbofan engines. The course covers in depth the compressor section, diffuser section, combustion section, turbine section and the exhaust and reverser, as well as an in-depth study of auxiliary power units. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to explain the theory of operation, and maintenance requirements of turbine engines, and can troubleshoot and repair turbine engine exhaust and reverser systems.

PPT 2006 – Turbine Engine Systems | 4 Credits

This course covers topics including turbine engine instrument systems, lubrication systems, fuel metering, ignition and starting systems. Also, included in this course are techniques for turbine engine inspections as well as turbine engine removal and replacement. A variety of lab projects including operation, maintenance and troubleshooting of the turbine engine and its systems enhance learning of course lessons. This course also includes a review and testing component which will aid the student in preparation for FAA certification exams. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to explain the operation and troubleshoot turbine engine lubrication, fuel metering, ignition and starting, engine instruments, and conduct maintenance and troubleshooting operations.

AMT Classes Offered at the Denver Campus

GEN 1001 – Basic Electricity | 4 Credits

In this course, students will study scientific laws and theories of electricity and its application to aircraft systems, components, and circuits. Concepts studied include fundamentals of magnetism, DC circuits, and AC circuits. In addition, students study the use of electrical measuring instruments, multi meters, and basic troubleshooting procedures. Students will perform analyses of electrical circuits and determine resistance, current, voltage, inductance, capacitance, impedance and power. Upon successful completion of this course, students should have a sound foundation of electrical theory and its application to aircraft systems and components, as well as knowing how to read and apply basic electrical schematics to aircraft.

GEN 1002 – Aviation Science | 4 Credits

This course will continue the study of electrical concepts to include, batteries, and additional information on reading and interpreting aircraft electrical circuit diagrams that include digital and solid-state circuits and logic functions. The students will perform laboratory experiments relating to electrical and electronic circuits. Students study aircraft drawings and make drawings of aircraft parts and repairs to aircraft parts. This course will also contain a detailed study of aviation materials and processes, that include the basic knowledge and skills in the use of basic mechanics hand tools, hardware and safety methods, principles of nondestructive testing including eddy current, ultrasonic, magnetic particle and dye penetrant procedures, and the student perform laboratory experiments in these procedures. Students will use precision measurement equipment including micrometers, calipers and dial indicators. Students will learn about and fabricate the various types of fluid lines and fitting used in the aircraft. In addition, the students will study aircraft cleaning and corrosion control methods and techniques and perform a corrosion inspection. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to service batteries, read wiring diagrams, read and complete drawings, demonstrate knowledge of aircraft materials and processes, aircraft fluid lines and corrosion control process.

GEN 1003 – Aviation Maintenance Practices | 4 Credits

This course covers topics, including technical writing in maintenance publications and maintenance forms and records, Students will read, select, and use FAA and manufacturer’s aircraft maintenance specifications, data sheets, manuals, publications, technical data, related Federal Aviation Regulations and aircraft records keeping. The course also incorporates aircraft ground operations and servicing procedures. The course covers a detailed study of aircraft weight and balance, including the actual weighing of an aircraft.  Lab projects for these topics are performed enhance classroom lecture. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to read in interpret maintenance publication, complete aircraft maintenance forms and records, perform basic ground operations and servicing of aircraft, weigh aircraft and perform all calculations, be aware of mechanic privileges and limitations and understand Human Factors that can affect aircraft maintenance.

AFP 1001 – Electrical and Fire Protection Systems | 4 Credits

This course provides study of airframe and powerplant electrical systems, including inspection and repair of components and related wiring, power distribution, and circuit troubleshooting. This course includes a detailed study of electrical schematics and their application and troubleshooting. This course also covers the study of various aircraft fire protection, detection, and extinguishing systems. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to troubleshoot and repair airframe electrical systems, know how to read and apply electrical schematics, and understand the operation and repair of aircraft fire protection systems.

ARF 2001 – Metallic Structures | 4 Credits

In this course, aircraft sheet metal structures and different fastening methods are studied in detail. Students will accomplish a wide variety of lab projects leading to an understanding of subject material. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to perform all basic tasks required of an aircraft maintenance technician related to metallic structures.

ARF 2002 – Non-Metallic Structures | 4 Credits

Students in this course will learn about composite structures including fiberglass, Kevlar, various core materials, and Plexiglass. Extensive lab work will enhance learned objectives. Also, covered in this course are wood structures, fabric coverings, and aircraft finishes. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to accomplish aircraft composite structure work, and can explain aircraft wood and fabric. Students should also to apply the finish to an aircraft.

ARF 2003 – Hydraulics and Landing Gear Systems | 4 Credits

The theory, operation, and maintenance of aircraft hydraulic and pneumatic systems are covered. The troubleshooting, maintenance, and repair of both systems is stressed. Aircraft landing gears, including retraction systems, oleos, brakes, wheels, and tires, are also studied. This course also includes study of aircraft position and warning systems. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to troubleshoot and repair aircraft hydraulic and pneumatic systems, aircraft landing gears, and understand the concepts of aircraft position and warning.

ARF 2004 – Comm/Nav and Instrument Systems | 4 Credits

This course covers the theory, operation, and maintenance of aircraft communication and navigation systems and the wide range of aircraft instrument systems found in today’s aircraft. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to explain the operation and maintenance of aircraft communication, navigation, and instrument systems.

ARF 2005 – Airframe Systems | 4 Credits

This course covers the theory and operation of aircraft cabin atmosphere control systems, ice and rain control systems along with water and waste systems. Aircraft fuel system theory, maintenance, and troubleshooting are also discussed, as well as the basic concepts of welding. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to explain the basic operation cabin atmosphere control systems, ice and rain control systems, maintain an aircraft fuel system, and perform basic welding processes.

ARF 2006 – Flight Controls and Airframe Inspections | 4 Credits

This course covers aircraft control surfaces, including system rigging, maintenance, inspection, and troubleshooting. This course also covers the basic concepts of rotary wing maintenance and operations. Also covered are the inspection techniques as they to the aircraft structure and its related systems. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to rig a general aviation aircraft, know the basic concepts of rotary wing aircraft and perform airframe conformity inspections. This course also includes a review and testing period to aid the student in FAA Airframe Certification.

PPT 2001 – Reciprocating Engines | 4 Credits

This course covers the theory and operation of a reciprocating engines. All internal components are studied, along with how each part functions. A reciprocating engine is disassembled, measured, reassembled, and timed. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to explain the operation of a reciprocating engine.

PPT 2002 – Reciprocating Engine Systems | 4 Credits

In this course the study of reciprocating engine lubrications, induction and engine airflow systems, engine cooling systems, and reciprocating engine exhaust systems are covered in detail. Reciprocating engine instrument systems are discussed. A reciprocating engine is removed and reinstalled. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to explain the operation of and inspect, troubleshoot and repair of engine induction, cooling, exhaust, and reciprocating engine instrument systems and can remove and reinstall an aircraft reciprocating engine.

PPT 2003 – Fuel Metering and Propellers | 4 Credits

In this course, students study the theory and operation of a wide variety of propellers and controlling governors. Reciprocating engine fuel and fuel metering devices, including float carburetors and fuel injection systems, are explained in detail. Upon completion of this course, students should understand all propeller operation and inspection requirements, and can troubleshoot and repair reciprocating engine fuel and fuel metering devices.

PPT 2004 – Engine Inspection and Operation | 4 Credits

In this course ignition systems, including magnetos, spark plugs, leads, and auxiliary starting systems, are covered in detail. A magneto is disassembled, inspected, reassembled, internally timed and timed to the engine. Lab activities include the ground operation, troubleshooting and repairs to various reciprocating engine systems. Students will perform a powerplant conformity inspection using FAA records and manufacturer’s publications and manuals. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to troubleshoot, repair, and time an aircraft magneto, and troubleshoot shoot and repair various reciprocating engine systems, explain engine ground operation procedures and perform engine inspection.

PPT 2005 – Turbine Engine Fundamentals | 4 Credits

This course studies turbine engine theory of operation as it applies to turbojet, turboprop and turbofan engines. The course covers in depth the compressor section, diffuser section, combustion section, turbine section and the exhaust and reverser, as well as an in-depth study of auxiliary power units. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to explain the theory of operation, and maintenance requirements of turbine engines, and can troubleshoot and repair turbine engine exhaust and reverser systems.

PPT 2006 – Turbine Engine Systems | 4 Credits

This course covers topics including turbine engine instrument systems, lubrication systems, fuel metering, ignition and starting systems. Also, included in this course are techniques for turbine engine inspections as well as turbine engine removal and replacement. A variety of lab projects including operation, maintenance and troubleshooting of the turbine engine and its systems enhance learning of course lessons. This course also includes a review and testing component which will aid the student in preparation for FAA certification exams. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to explain the operation and troubleshoot turbine engine lubrication, fuel metering, ignition and starting, engine instruments, and conduct maintenance and troubleshooting operations.

A&P Classes Offered at the Los Angeles Campus

AF 111 – Metallic Structures | 150 Clock Hours

In this course, students learn aircraft structures, techniques of sheet metal repair using proper tools, parts layout, and forming and bending aluminum materials.

AF 112 – Non-Metallic Structures | 150 Clock Hours

In this course, students learn the basic skills used in applying aircraft finishes, repairing aircraft wood structures, and fabric and composite coverings. Additionally, this course will cover Ice and rain control systems to complete this block of study.

AF 113 – Hydraulic and Pneumatic Systems | 150 Clock Hours

In this course, students learn how to service, troubles hoot, and repair hydraulic and pneumatic systems and components. Inspection and repair of landing gear and aircraft electrical systems complete this block of study.

AF 114 – Aircraft Systems | 150 Clock Hours

The student studies the operating, inspecting, servicing, and troubleshooting of aircraft oxygen, pressurization, heating and air conditioning systems, position and warning systems, as well as aircraft instrument, communication and navigation systems.

AF 115 – Aircraft Flight Control and Fuel Systems | 150 Clock Hours

In this course, the student learns various welding inspections, assembly and rigging of aircraft controls, aircraft fuel systems, and aircraft fire protection.

GN 101 – Aviation Science | 150 Clock Hours

This course develops skills in basic algebra and calculator mathematics. Basic Physics includes concepts of motion fluid dynamic s, heat, sound, and aerodynamics. It also incorporates an introduction to maintenance forms and records as well as maintenance publications.

GN 102 – Electrical Theory | 150 Clock Hours

This course concerns the fundamentals of magnetism and electricity, basic electricity includes performing analysis on electrical circuits as well as calculation of resistance, impedance, and power. An introduction to aircraft materials and processes is also included in this course.

GN 103 – Aviation Maintenance Procedures | 150 Clock Hours

This course develops skills interpreting aircraft drawings, blueprints and schematics, fabricating hydraulic lines and fittings, aircraft and engine ground operations, handling and servicing, identification of corrosion and treatment procedures. Also included in this course are mechanic privileges and limitations, aircraft weight and balance procedures, and an introduction to non-destructive testing (NDT).

IR 130 (A) – Inspection and Review | 150 Clock Hours

This course involves Engine Change, Inspection, Review, and Testing. Students perform Airframe and Powerplant inspections and manage documentation using FAA Aircraft Records and Maintenance Publications. An engine change, using checklists and appropriate aircraft/engine manuals, will complete this course. Course review and final testing are also accomplished in this block.

PP121 – Reciprocating Engines | 150 Clock Hours

This course introduces designs, construction, and operations of radial and opposed reciprocating engines. The techniques used in disassembling, cleaning, inspecting, and repair of such engines are also emphasized.

PP122 – Powerplant Systems | 150 Clock Hours

This course involves the fundamentals of operation, inspection and repair of fire protection, ignition and starting, engine instruments and engine electrical systems.

PP123 – Turbine Engine Theory and Operation | 150 Clock Hours

This course introduces the basic theory, maintenance techniques, and troubleshooting procedures used on gas turbine engines. Disassembling, inspecting, reassembling, and adjusting turbine engines are major elements of this subject area. Basic operation and repair of exhaust systems complete this course.

PP124 – Propellers and Exhaust Systems | 150 Clock Hours

This course studies the theory and operations of propellers as well as their disassembly, inspection, repair and maintenance. The detailed study of engine exhaust and cooling systems and fuel systems is also included.

PP125 – Fuel Metering and Lubrication Systems | 150 Clock Hours

This course studies inspection and repair of simple and complex fuel metering devices. Induction and lubricating systems complete this course.

AMT Classes Offered at the Inland Empire Campus

GEN 1113 – General Module 1 | 3 Credits

In this class the student will study the concepts of aircraft aerodynamics, ground operations and servicing and aircraft drawings. The student will also study maintenance human factors which affect aircraft maintenance as well as mechanics privileges and limitations. The students also study basic mathematics which will be in an applied format and will include: fractions, decimals, ratios and proportions, percentages, sine numbers, transforming formulas, powers and roots, basic geometry, number bases, scientific notation, basic trig functions, and basic vectors. Students study aircraft drawings and make drawings of aircraft parts and repairs to aircraft parts.

GEN 1123 – General Module 2 | 3 Credits

In this class students will study the concepts of physics which include: matter, fluid dynamics, atmospheric properties, machines, work, power, energy, motion, heat and temperature and sound as they apply to an aircraft. The students will study aircraft weight and balance and understand effects of weight and balance on the proper operation of an aircraft, the student will weigh an aircraft, perform weight and balance computations using typical forms, graphs, charts and manufacturer’s data. The students will also discuss and fabricate aircraft fluid lines and fittings and their installation in the aircraft.

GEN 1133 – General Module 3 | 3 Credits

In this class students will study fundamentals of magnetism and electricity. They perform analyses of electrical circuits and determine resistance, current, voltage, inductance, capacitance, impedance and power. In addition students study the use of electrical measuring instruments and basic troubleshooting procedures.

GEN 1143 – General Module 4 | 3 Credits

In this class students will study aircraft batteries. The student will perform laboratory experiments relating to electrical and electronic circuits. In addition they are able to read and interpret aircraft electrical circuit diagrams; to include digital and solid state circuits and logic functions. Students gain basic knowledge and skills in the use of basic mechanics hand tools, hardware and safety methods, In addition the principles of nondestructive testing including eddy current, ultrasonic, magnetic particle and dye penetrant procedures are taught, and the student perform laboratory experiments in these procedures. The student’s use of precision measurement equipment including micrometers, calipers and dial indicators.

GEN 1153 – General and Powerplant Module 5 | 3 Credits

In this class students will read, select, and use FAA and manufacturer’s aircraft maintenance specifications, data sheets, manuals, publications, technical data, related Federal Aviation Regulations and aircraft records keeping. In addition the students will study aircraft cleaning and corrosion control methods and techniques. Students will discuss various types of electrical motors and their functions, study inverters, rectifiers and related

aircraft power distribution systems system. They select and install wiring and electrical components, and use of the multi-meter to troubleshoot electrical circuits.

PPT 2113 – Airframe and Powerplant Module 6 | 3 Credits

In this class students will learn the use of the multi-meter to troubleshoot electrical circuits, disassemble, inspect, reassemble and operationally check AC and DC generators and alternators. Students inspect, service, and repair engine and aircraft fire detection and protection systems.

PPT 2123 – Powerplant Module 7 | 3 Credits

In this class students will study the theory of operation for reciprocating aircraft engines. Students disassemble, clean and reassemble an engine using manufacturers’ approved and acceptable data, and FAA regulations. They will discuss the function and operation of engine internal components and the engine lubricating systems.

PPT 2133 – Powerplant Module 8 | 3 Credits

In this class students will discuss and apply and overhaul procedures and techniques as they apply to an aircraft reciprocating engine. Student will inspect and repair engine components in accordance with manufacturers generally accepted procedures. Students will also discuss engine exhaust systems, and engine cooling systems.

PPT 2143 – Powerplant Module 9 | 3 Credits

In this class students will discuss the fundamentals of engine fuel systems and fuel metering systems. Students will disassemble, inspect, reassemble and test various engine fuel systems components and fuel metering system components.

PPT 2153 – Powerplant Module 10 | 3 Credits

In this class students will discuss reciprocating engine ignition systems, component construction and theory of operation. They identify, disassemble, inspect, repair, and reassemble ignition system components and controls in accordance with FAA and manufacturers’ approved data. They internally time magnetos, operationally check ignition systems and analyze and/or troubleshoot ignition systems. In addition propeller systems are studied. Students study and reference applicable manufacturers’ data and FAA regulations. They perform maintenance and make adjustments to various propeller system components.

PPT 2163 – Powerplant Module 11 | 3 Credits

In this class students study the principles of jet propulsion, the principle parts of a gas turbine engine and their operations. They disassemble, inspect, reassemble, remove and install a gas turbine engine in accordance with applicable manufacturers’ and Federal Aviation Administration publications and airworthiness directives.

PPT 2173 – Powerplant Module 12 | 3 Credits

In this class students learn principles of inspection and servicing of a gas turbine engine. Students discuss various engine systems to include fuel controls, oils systems, ignition systems engine instrumentation and monitoring systems, exhaust and reverser systems as well as maintenance and troubleshooting of these systems. In addition they will discuss airborne auxiliary power units and un-ducted fan systems.

PPT 2183 – Powerplant Module 19 | 3 Credits

In this class the student will learn the various types of engine instruments used on an aircraft. Students will apply all materials learned in powerplant related modules to start, ground operate and troubleshoot various powerplant systems. In addition, the student will perform a powerplant conformity inspection in accordance with all applicable approved data. They will write condition reports, maintenance records and determine compliance with all approved data.

ARF 2213 Airframe Module – Basic Sheet metal, Forming and Construction | 3 Credits

Students learn the basic techniques necessary to perform sheet metal repairs on aircraft structures; this includes studying applicable Federal Aviation Administration regulations. Students develop skills using sheet metal tools, laying out parts and forming parts with bending machines.

ARF 2223 Airframe Module – Sheet metal Repair, Non-metallic Structure & Composites | 3 Credits

In this class the student will learn forming metal by hand, and repairing various structural airframe components. Additionally, students learn to inspect and evaluate honeycomb or laminated structural damage as well as damaged transparent acrylic materials. They develop skills in removing and repairing damaged honeycomb and laminated structural materials and repairing acrylic materials. Students will also discuss aircraft wood structures and fabric covered aircraft.

ARF 2233 Airframe Module – Basic Welding, Paints & Finishes and Flight Controls | 3 Credits

Students discuss basic welding operations to include soldering brazing and gas welding. Additionally they apply finishing materials and identify finish defects. The students are able to disassemble, reassemble, and rig aircraft flight control systems and components in accordance with manufacturers’ procedures and FAA specifications. They learn the operation of flight controls for fixed-wing and rotary- wing aircraft and the application of aerodynamic principles.

ARF 2243 Airframe Module – Aircraft Hydraulics and Landing Gear Systems | 3 Credits

In this class the student will learn to identify and select hydraulic fluids, determine the correct seal to use, and apply the proper techniques during seal removal and installation. Students are able to explain the operating principles and basic troubleshooting techniques of hydraulic and pneumatic power systems. In addition, students will discuss and apply concepts on disassemble, inspection, reassembly, troubleshooting and operationally checking aircraft landing gear systems and their related components.

ARF 2253 Airframe Module – Airframe Systems I | 3 Credits

In this class the students are able to explain the operating principles and basic troubleshooting techniques fuel, pressurization, oxygen, anti-ice, de-ice, vapor-cycle, and heating systems and their respective components. Students are able to determine the airworthiness of systems, subsystems, and components by using operational checks, servicing procedures, and inspections contained in approved data. In addition, students will discuss aircraft instrument systems and position and warning systems. Also, students inspect and troubleshoot airframe electrical malfunctions.

ARF 2263 Airframe Module – Airframe Systems II | 3 Credits

In this class the student discuss ice and rain control systems, their principles of operation and basic troubleshooting concepts. The student will also discuss and apply information on aircraft fuel systems to include operational checks. In addition, the student will discuss the various communication and navigation systems found onboard a modern aircraft.

ARF 2273 Airframe Module – Aircraft Inspection, Airworthiness, Documentations & 737NG Fam | 3 Credits

Students learn to use the following: FAA type certificate data sheets, aircraft records; maintenance publications; and Federal Regulations pertinent to airframe inspections. Students also develop skills in performing airworthiness inspections on the airframe and its systems, including avionics, instruments and fuel systems. Students will complete a familiarization course on a large transport airframe and its related systems.